Horticultural Gems of France

France has a rich and well known history of gardens and gardening, from the large palace gardens to the wonderful potager gardens. However there are some very well known and some lesser known elements of the French horticultural scene and we will explore some of these today.

Santiago de Chili

Marble Fountain By Guilhem Vellut from Paris, France (Fountain @ Paris) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]

The Square Santiago de Chili is a wonderful green retreat in the 7th arrondissement of Paris. A kind of oasis in the city with magnificent Oriental Plane Trees and a bust of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, the French writer, poet and pioneering aviator. Not forgetting the gorgeous marble fountain, the garden makes for a welcome change to the busy urban environment.

Lavender Stoechas (French Lavender)

French Lavender, By User:Xemenendura (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.1 es (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.1/es/deed.en)]

French Lavender is one of the most recognisable lavenders as it has distinctive petals at the top of each flower, somewhat reminiscent of butterfly wings, and typically they will flower earlier than common lavender, with flowers appearing as early as May. One important thing to note however is that they are far less hardy than the common lavender, so if winter is very cold it can be the death knell for them.

Jardin botanique d’Èze

Exotic Cacti and Succulents, By Berthold Werner (Own work) [Public domain]

The Botanical Garden of Èze, in Èze not far from Nice has the most wonderful array of exotic succulents and cacti. It is situated in a steep area that falls over 400 meters towards the sea and has magnificent panoramic views of the coast. Amongst the plants you will find an impressive variety of Agaves, Yuccas, Aloes and various species of Cacti.

Garlic (Allium Sativum)

Garlic, By Pivari (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)

Garlic, often associated with France and French agriculture has been cultivated for thousands of years over the Mediterranean region and is a firm favourite with growers and chefs alike. It is a close relative of onions, chives, leeks, shallots and ornamental alliums.

Overall there are many elements that give France a long and exciting horticultural history and today we have touched on just a few.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *