Contemporary US Fiction for Teens

For this blog post I wanted to share two novels and a film adaptation that I have recently enjoyed that are recent representations of US culture for teens and young adults.

Eleanor & Park

Eleanor & Park is a book about a girl: Eleanor, who lives in a house hold with four other siblings, her mother and abusive dad. She doesn’t own necessities such as a toothbrush or proper clothes so she is often bullied for this. It’s also about a boy: Park, a boy who comes from a loving family but thinks of himself as a disappointment. He stands up for Eleanor and wants to become her boyfriend but as Eleanor’s abusive father won’t let her have a boyfriend they are seeing each other secretly. I am reading this book at the moment and would definitely recommend it!

About the Author: Rainbow Rowell (born February 24, 1973) is an American author of young adult and adult contemporary novels. Her young adult novels Eleanor & Park (2013) Fangirl (2013) and Carry On (2015) have been highly recommended!

The Fault In Our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars by popular young adult author John Green, is about a sixteen year-old girl called Hazel Grace Lancaster who lives in the USA. She has cancer that has spread to her lungs and believes that her whole life will consist solely of hospital appointments and therapy from then on. One day her mother signs her up for a cancer patient support group, Hazel is mortified and thinks this is the new, worst thing in her life.

At the group she meets a seventeen year-old boy, Augustus Waters (who lost one of his legs to cancer). Augustus is there to support his friend Isaac (whose remaining eye is to be removed due to cancer). Hazel and Augustus immediately bond and decide to swap novels, Hazel recommends to Augustus a book about a girl with cancer whose life is similar to hers written by a Dutch author called Van Houten who disappeared after the novel’s publication. Augustus is horrified to realise that the book that Hazel recommended ended abruptly and decides to try and track down the author’s personal assistant and starts up an on-going conversation via E-mail.

A year later he surprises Hazel with tickets to Amsterdam where he confesses his love for Hazel. Hazel and Augustus meet Van Houten but are disappointed with his selfish behaviour. Augustus also confesses a secret to Hazel which propels the novel to it’s tearful ending! I enjoyed both the book and the film adaptation of the story and would recommend (though not if you need cheering up!).